The Kansas City Symphony Designers’ Showhouse

I was recently in Kansas City visiting our marvelous customer, Scandia Home & Terrasi European Collection, to attend the Kansas City Symphony Designers’ Showhouse, where our Sonata lavender duvet
cover, shams and coordinates were featured.  The showhouse was a fund raiser for the Kansas City Symphony.  It was hands down the most beautiful showhouse I have ever attended or participated in, largely because of the cohesive, understated looks room to room.  This had much to do with the proactive participation of the owners, who set the overall palette choices, but the end result was stunning and elegant.

Ursula Terrasi of Scandia Home & Terrasi European Collection’s room was a study in understated elegance.  The bed was the focal point and was lovely and inviting.  It was the first time I ever saw a bedroom in a showhouse treated as a sanctuary rather than the more common focus on drapes, wall and floor coverings and interior decor at the expense of the bed, which can set the tone of comfort and beauty but is so frequently overlooked in show houses.  Perhaps it takes the vision of seasoned professionals in our linen industry, such as the team in Ursula’s KC store, to lead the way to showing designers and the public how much a beautifully dressed bed can alter the mood and tone of a bedroom.  The additional beauty of a focus on fine linens in designing a bedroom is that the style and color scheme of a room can be altered with minimal investment by focusing on bedding color or pattern changes season to season that can substantially change a bedroom’s mood and allure.

The room was designed and executed by the professional, knowledgeable staff at Terrasi European Collection, located on the Plaza in downtown Kansas City. The finished room was a beautiful and serene environment mixing a spa-like palette of acqua, pale blue and lavender that played off of the colors of our featured Sonata Lavender bedding ensemble.  This watery palette was mixed with soothing unlined white linen curtains and pleated shades at the windows, giving an overall feeling of welcoming comfort and understated luxury. The Scandia Home & Terrasi European Collection contact information is as follows if you may have any interest or inquiries regarding the room!

 

 

Capture

 

Cheers,

Nancy

 

Posted in Home No Comments

Holiday Reception at the White House

I had the delightful occasion to attend a reception at the White House last week to celebrate the holidays.  The decorations were stunning, from the lovely gold garlands and vines framing the East entrance to the 18 foot tree in the Blue Room that was decorated with handmade ornaments representing all 50 states.
As we stepped inside the East Entrance we were greeted by beautiful holiday music: from a DC men’s a capella choir in the entry rotunda and on the vast landing of the floor above, by a military band ensemble in festive red jackets.
The East Room and the State Dining Room were each set up in banquet style, with a long central table decorated with magnificent floral arrangements and an abundant buffet beautifully and tastefully prepared by the White House chef and staff.
The event was festive and an honor to our nation’s history, journey and traditions.
Happy holidays to all!

Posted in Home, Photo Galleries No Comments

Springtime in Manhattan

Manhattan is in the full bloom of spring and its avenues and parks, large and small, are a splendid mix of color and composition – very uplifting after a long, gray winter/ a wonder to behold.  Central Park is an oasis of tranquility and beauty, reawakening with a profusion of pink flowering fruit tress, daffodils and the riotous colors of tulips. Madison Square Park, our neighboring green oasis in the Flatiron District, recently hosted the opening of a public arts installation by a very creative textile artist, Orly Genger, whose monumental textile sculptures add unexpected undulating walls of color and texture to the tranquility of a lovely urban square.

 

 

 

Flatiron-Building-and-art-installation,-evening-view,-Madison-Square-Park        Textile-art-installation,-Madison-Square-Park.-Artist-Orly-Genger

The-Pond,-Central-Park       Cherry-trees-and-daffodils,-Central-Park

A-profusion-of-color-in-tulips-and-textile-art,-Madison-Square-Park      Central-Park-West-skyline

Cherry-trees-with-skyline,-Central-Park

Posted in Home, Photo Galleries No Comments

The Process and Technology of Jacquard Weaving

I was recently in Italy working on new collections for introduction late summer 2013 and beyond.  I have also been reminded that 2014 will mark my 30th anniversary in the luxury linen business, which is hard to imagine.

Since I am presently working on new jacquard patterns, I thought it might be interesting to share photos of the Italian jacquard looms that weave our designs, including the new one to be introduced this coming August.  For those of you less familiar with textiles, a jacquard – or damask – is a fabric with an intricately woven pattern.  The weaving process is fascinating and high-tech and the “sheds” where our fabrics are woven are very noisy and, by necessity, very clean.  Large suspended vacuums move on a track above each row of looms to remove airborne lint and dust that might otherwise get woven into the cloth in production.

The entire process, from design development to finished product, can take as long a one year to bring to market.  In addition to the design, color, scale and yarn size need to be confirmed, yarns in custom colors need to be dyed and the warps prepared.   Many of our original jacquard designs were done on older looms with punched cards, similar to a player piano, that controlled the design.  These looms were slow and could weave only 100 mt or so per day (a picture of the punch card format follows below).

The newer looms are much faster and the designs (now in disc format) are driven by computer.  In simplistic form, the program controls the raising or lowering of the harness, which guides the vertical warp thread so the weft (horizontal) yarns that run side to side across the width will lie over or under the warp yarn, creating the pattern.

Jacquard loom: Showing the tall harness (pink), which controls the warp thread placement.  On the loom is a classic damask pattern.

Jacquard loom: Showing the tall harness (pink), which controls the warp thread placement. On the loom is a classic damask pattern.

Side view of jacquard loom: showing the huge height and scale of the harness for a wide width jacquard.  Most of our jacquard fabrics are 130" wide "loomstate" (ie unfinished off the loom) and 118" wide finished (ie; after washing and calendaring).

Side view of jacquard loom: showing the huge height and scale of the harness for a wide width jacquard. Most of our jacquard fabrics are 130″ wide “loomstate” (ie unfinished off the loom) and 118″ wide finished (ie; after washing and calendaring).

Close-up of the weft and computer drive: the shuttle, once made of wood and now hard plastic, is moved back and forth at high speed across the width of the fabric.  The placement of the yarn over or under the weft yarn creates the pattern.

Close-up of the weft and computer drive: the shuttle, once made of wood and now hard plastic, is moved back and forth at high speed across the width of the fabric. The placement of the yarn over or under the weft yarn creates the pattern.

Side view of the loom showing the weft yarn feed.

Side view of the loom showing the weft yarn feed.

Old jacquard punch card system: this is a variation of the original punch card system developed in 1801 by Joseph Marie Jacquard in France.  The loom was controlled by a chain of punched cards laced together in continuous sequence, with each row of punched holes corresponding to one row of the design.  This invention at the beginning of the 19th century vastly simplified the process of weaving textiles with complex designs and was the precursor to calculating machines and thus computing.

Old jacquard punch card system: this is a variation of the original punch card system developed in 1801 by Joseph Marie Jacquard in France. The loom was controlled by a chain of punched cards laced together in continuous sequence, with each row of punched holes corresponding to one row of the design. This invention at the beginning of the 19th century vastly simplified the process of weaving textiles with complex designs and was the precursor to calculating machines and thus computing.

 

Posted in Home, Photo Galleries No Comments

Memorable Evening

I received a surprise call this May from my long time friend and colleague, Former White House interior designer Michael Smith, inviting me to a gala he was co-hosting with Margaret Russell, Editor and Chief of Architectural Digest, for the President and First Lady Barack and Michelle Obama. Michael had selected our Eleanor’s Ribbon linens for the White House master suite, making the President and First Lady our esteemed customers. (I remember the call well, a week before the Inauguration. Timing was tough.)

The gala – an elegant affair – took place in mid June at the Plaza Hotel in New York. It was a decidedly designer – driven event, attended by luminaries from the world of interior design and architecture, including trade magazine editors and writers and a myriad of textile, furniture and accessory designer / owners.

I was seated at Margaret Russell’s table and had the pleasure of sitting next to an admired colleague, the very talented architect Calvin Tsao and his partner Zack McKnown of Tsao & McKnown. We had lots to catch up and reminisced about favorite collaborative projects. At the same table were Lisa Kravet of Kravet Fabrics and Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams of Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams; Michael Smith sat at the adjoining table with an equally fascinating group.

It was an honor and delight to meet the President and First Lady, who were both elegant and extremely gracious. When I told the First Lady that I was the designer of their bed linens, her face lit up and she gave me an unexpected, spontaneous hug. This was not only gratifying, but certainly made the evening particularly memorable.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Home, Photo Galleries No Comments

Autumn Mist

After visiting friends I had an early go this morning and walking along a slumbering harbor to reach the first ferry, I was struck by the beauty and tranquility of dawn by the sea in early November.  There was a heavy mist, blanketing sound and diffusing the first morning light.  Quite enchanting.

 

Posted in Home 1 Comment

Ode to my Father

Ode to my Father:

My father passed away suddenly but peacefully on 29 September 2011.
He was a physician, a psychiatrist – a bright and complicated man with
a great love of family, the arts and the harp.  But in his heart of
hearts he was a gentleman farmer.  He loved nothing more than to
putter around his property, taking the tractor for “a spin” or hiking
down to the pond to feed his swans and koi and chase off interloping
mallards and raccoons.  He kept sheep, tended to sick and rejected
lambs every spring and added bells to the necks of some ewes so he
would always know where they were.  The tinkling of those sheep bells
is an enduring memory. (As is the streaming tail of a peacock roosting
in the tree outside my bedroom window on summer nights.)
So my siblings and I grew up with up with an odd menagerie too varied
to mention, each breed with its own stories and all named and part of
his flock.   We helped Dad as best we could -sometimes
enthusiastically and sometimes not – with the possible exception of
bottle feeding baby lambs in a box in my parents’ bathroom, with our
mother taking the after midnight shifts.

In later years when we were older and wiser we worried along with our
mother over his tendency for high adventure and tried to curtail his
solo “spins” on the tractor on steep hillsides or to pull stumps out
of the pond.  He suffered many injuries over the years as a result of
this abundant enthusiasm, but he was never bowed.

It was a sad day when the tractor had to be retired permanently to the
barn. Once or twice he rode down in his gator to “turn it over” for
old times sake, hopefully respecting the family edict to not climb the
6+ feet up to its seat.

So this is a pictorial ode to my father and some of his favorite
things – the simple outdoor ones that gave him freedom and joy and
allowed his heart to soar.

Tags:
Posted in Home, Photo Galleries 1 Comment

Vermont

My second trip was at the end of August to New Hampshire and VT to deliver my son to his freshman year in college.  I stayed with a cousin in VT who lives at the top of a mountain, again with sweeping views – but of mountains rather than ocean.  It is an idyllic spot and their gardens were beautiful and inviting.  A very New England feeling through-out.

 

Posted in Home No Comments

Pacifica, CA

I’ve been on quite a number of trips. I a visited San Francisco for a friend’s wedding celebration followed by visits to customers in the SF and Bay area.  My friend’s celebration was at her father’s lovely home in in a small coastal town south of San Francisco called Pacifica.  His house sits on the cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, with sweeping views of the coast and the distant ocean fog banks – the view filtered through characteristic west coast cedars.

 

Posted in Home, Photo Galleries No Comments

Northeast Designer Showhouse – MH Studio showcases Nancy Koltes Linens

Manhattan designer, Shari Markbreiter of MH Studio, paired our classic Eleanor’s Ribbon white/azure sheeting and white Savoy quilted coverlet with pale green jacquard bed hangings from Cullman Kravis to create a timelessly elegant bedroom that is both understated and soothing.

The show house, called Nirvana, is located in Bedford Corners, NY and benefited the Cerebral Palsy Organization of Westchester. The room will be featured in the October editions of two publications this Fall: Connecticut Cottages and Gardens and Westchester Cottages and Gardens.

Posted in Home No Comments